We are recruiting now for the Ways for Adolescents
to Validate Emotions (WAVE) study!

We are recruiting now for the Ways for Adolescents to Validate Emotions (WAVE) study!

Please call Megan at (412) 864-3321 or email wavestudy@upmc.edu to learn more about the WAVE study!

In this study, we are investigating two psychotherapy approaches (Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Standard of Care Psychotherapy at our CABS clinic) for adolescents with bipolar disorder. We know that psychotherapy, with medications, can be helpful in managing bipolar disorder. However, there is much to be learned about which type of therapy is best for which adolescent with bipolar disorder. So, the goal of this study is to better understand the way different psychotherapy approaches help adolescents with bipolar disorder.

Who is eligible? Adolescents age 12-18 with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and their family members.

What does participation involve? Participation in the study lasts for 2 years. Participating families will be randomly assigned (by chance) to receive one of 2 psychotherapy treatments for an entire year free of charge. One group will receive Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), and one group will receive Standard of Care Psychotherapy at our CABS clinic. Both of these approaches include individual therapy for the adolescent and some family involvement. All participating adolescents will see a psychiatrist to manage their medications. Families are compensated for their participation.

NEW!! We recently received funding from the National Institute of Mental Health to conduct brain scans (functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI) at 2 timepoints during study participation–before treatment and again 6 months into the course of psychotherapy treatment for all eligible and interested participants. This exciting addition to our research will enable us to better understand how brain functioning changes during the course of psychotherapy treatment.

Click here to learn more about Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

This study is supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (MH1000056)